#WorldRhinoDay #RoastedForACause

#WorldRhinoDay #RoastedForACause

Photo Credit: Chris van Zyl On 22 September, we celebrate World Rhino Day. This year is a special celebration: the first time in five years that fewer than 1000* rhinos were poached in one year. The recorded number of rhino poached in 2018 is still a staggering 769, but there has been a steady decline nationally in the number of rhinos poached in South Africa since 2016. Last year, we also saw the first successful prosecution of the notorious Ndlovu rhino poaching gang in Grahamstown High Court. The overall decline in rhino poaching may be attributed to successful interventions including Anti-Poaching Units (APU) supported by specially-trained K9 units; advanced rhino monitoring and tracking; translocating rhinos to private reserves; and – perhaps most importantly – the collaboration, commitment and dedication of people and businesses raising awareness and funding to protect our last remaining rhino. A pertinent example is Mastertons Coffee & Tea Specialists, crafters of the ‘Chipembere’ Rhino Coffee Blend, roasted for a cause. Driven to protect our rhino and inspired by the conservation efforts of Chipembere Rhino Foundation, Mastertons donates R5 for every 250 grams of ‘Chipembere’ coffee purchased by retailers and coffee-loving rhino supporters to Chipembere Rhino Foundation, contributing significantly to their rhino conservation efforts. Indulging in a cup of ‘Chipembere’ coffee is just one of the ways you can contribute to this worthwhile cause. The unwavering support from retailers that stock ‘Chipembere’ coffee and coffee-lovers countrywide enjoying Chipembere coffee blend has already contributed significantly to the protection of our rhinos, empowering Anti-Poaching Units through initiatives such as a specially trained anti-poaching K9 team in the Eastern Cape;...
Eastern Cape APU teams trained as Combat Man Trackers

Eastern Cape APU teams trained as Combat Man Trackers

Well-trained and competent field rangers with an advanced skill set that includes the efficient tracking of humans, are an increasingly vital tool for Anti-Poaching Units (APUs) to successfully manage and counter the escalating threat of poaching of rhino and elephant for their horn and ivory. Eight highly skilled APU rangers from three private game reserves recently attended an advanced eight-day SASSETA (Safety & Security Sector Education Training Authority) accredited Combat Man Tracker Training course at Kwandwe Game Reserve in the Eastern Cape, thanks to a Chipembere Rhino Foundation funded and Game Rangers Association of Africa (GRAA) coordinated collaboration. The expert facilitation of the training course is also a joint initiative between the Southern African Wildlife College (SAWC) and Counter Insurgency Tracker Training (CITT). The course was designed to contribute to curbing the current poaching crisis in South Africa by upskilling APU and field rangers to identify signs of human activity and human tracks left by poachers and to identify and react to illegal and criminal activity in their areas of operation. “Within the current legal system, poachers are in many instances not convicted due to technicalities. For this reason, it is imperative that field rangers or game guards conducting counter-poaching operations are qualified, at a national level, in man tracking,” explains Colin Patrick, co-founder of CITT, who is a qualified professional hunter and Senior Tracker; an accredited training provider with the Field Guides Association of South Africa (FGASA); and an approved Sasseta and Cathseta assessor. “The training serves to impart the skills, knowledge and tactics required for trackers to be successful and efficient, thereby maximising their effectiveness in the...

Pin It on Pinterest