Our Mission: Saving Rhino One at a Time

Our Mission: Saving Rhino One at a Time

Supporting Rhino conservation and improving stringent anti-poaching efforts needed on the ground – where it counts!

Rhino Monitoring Technology

The Chipembere Rhino Foundation is continuously sourcing, testing and funding the right technology needed for effective and meaningful monitoring of Rhino on the ground – where it is needed!

K9 Project

The Chipembere Rhino Foundation’s K9 component is a poaching deterrent in Southern Africa. Trained tracking and apprehension dogs have shown to contribute significantly in curbing poaching.

Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) Equipment

The Chipembere Rhino Foundation implements effective and meaningful anti-poaching equipment that is proven, tested and long lasting for rangers on the ground.

Rhino Translocations

The Chipembere Rhino Foundation is committed to funding the necessary equipment needed by partner organisations committed to trans-locating Rhino into safer and better protected areas or countries.


About The Chipembere Rhino Foundation

Chipembere Rhino Foundation is an NGO run by trustees with extensive Rhino experience and assisted by a group of committed volunteers. CRF specialises in sourcing, testing and funding technology for effective monitoring of Rhino; funding K9 handlers and their tracking and apprehension dogs; providing anti-poaching teams with vital equipment; funding equipment needed to translocate Rhino across Southern Africa and collaborating with other like minded NGO’s and companies.

For 50 million years, rhinos have been roaming the earth. These iconic and charismatic animals are an irreplaceable part of our spectacular African natural heritage. Sadly, rhinos are being poached to the point of extinction. The mere 4,800 African Black rhino left are already classified as critically endangered, while the remaining 20,000 African White rhino are classified as near-threatened. Poaching levels have reached crisis point: between 2000 and 2013, 2,700 rhinos were slaughtered, with another 1215 rhino butchered in 2014.

Chipembere Rhino Foundation LogoAfter witnessing the senseless slaughter of their two rhino breeding bulls in 2010, the Cook and Naudé families, owners of HillsNek Safari Camp in South Africa decided to step up their conservation efforts.

Read About Our History

News and Press Releases

Local Boy Riley’s Rally For Rhinos

Local Boy Riley’s Rally For Rhinos

Riley Devan, a 13-year-old boy in Grade 8 at Selborne Primary School in East London, has already helped to raise more than R25,000 for organisations that work to save his favourite animals: the critically endangered rhino. Riley’s Rally for Rhinos started in 2014 after a Rooting For Rhino campaign at his school. “My Dad and I both chose the rhino as our favourite animal. We wondered how sad it would be if they were extinct by the time I became a dad.  I wanted to do something to help save the rhinos, so I started thinking about ways to raise money for the organisations who work to save these wonderful creatures.” Riley, with lots of help from mom, Meg, began selling cookies and popcorn at school to raise funds. Soon Riley had a great idea: creating a dice-type game called Rolling Rhinos. The game is played by rolling two little resin rhinos and scoring points depending on how the rhinos land, with the first player to score 100 points winning the game. Every part of the game is made locally in East London, creating local economic benefits too. The polyester resin rhinos are made in a local family-owned décor factory. The game inserts and labels are printed locally and even the bags are sewed by a local NPO using Shweshwe fabric, synonymous with the Eastern Cape. The games are sold for R100 each at markets and via the Rolling Rhinos Facebook Page, and for each game sold, R25 goes to rhino protection efforts. To date, Riley’s Rally For Rhinos has donated R8,300 to the Chipembere Rhino Foundation and R6,000... read more
Supporting EC’s Conservation Soldiers

Supporting EC’s Conservation Soldiers

To salute and support our brave conservation soldiers and show appreciation of their crucial role in the battle to save our rhino, the Chipembere Rhino Foundation in collaboration with RAGES (Rotarian Action Group for Endangered Species), undertook a mission to collect bonus rations for the men of the Eastern Cape Rhino Anti-Poaching Units (APU).

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How a 14-year-old girl is saving our rhinos

How a 14-year-old girl is saving our rhinos

Jules Murray, a South African-born young lady has been living in Hong Kong for over nine years and recently returned to South Africa, attending DSG School in Grahamstown. Jules’ Save the Rhino journey started after hearing about the plight of the rhino, and deciding to do what she could to make a difference. When Jules Murray recently addressed the World Youth Rhino Summit, the most amazing thing was not the R160, 000 she has raised to date for rhino conservation. The most amazing thing is that Jules was just 13 years old! So, on her 11th birthday, Jules skipped the traditional birthday party and instead asked her friends to join her in painting Save the Rhino pictures, which were auctioned, raising R30, 000. Jules donated the money to the Chipembere Rhino Foundation (CRF), a local NGO dedicated to protecting and preserving the diminishing number of rhino in South Africa. CRF bought three radio tracking collars for rhinos in the Eastern Cape reserves. When Jules and her family later visited South Africa, the CRF team invited Jules to join them in the helicopter and to help collar the rhino. “The day had a huge impact on me. To be up close, and to see and touch these gentle giants was a truly humbling experience,” says Jules. “Meeting the CRF team was so inspiring; I knew I had to carry on doing what I could to raise money and awareness to save these beautiful creatures. So I started the JuMu Rhino Fund, determined to raise more money.”

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